At the dark end of the street summary

at the dark end of the street summary

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All the names of the women who probably should have appeared in other books are written here. Rosa Parks was a militant race woman, a sharp detective, and an antirape activist long before she became the patron saint of the bus boycott. According to McGuire African American women had long been struggling against sexualized violence and rape and were actually the harbingers and often forgotten leaders of movements like the Montgomery Bus Boycott. We found no such entries for this book title. Black women on city buses consistently challenged discrimination, some finding themselves in courtrooms where they would again assert rights to dignity and respect. The author gives us the never-before-told history of how the civil rights movement began; how it was in part started in protest against the ritualistic rape of black women by white men who used economic intimidation, sexual violence, and terror to derail the freedom movement; and how those forces persisted unpunished throughout the Jim Crow era when white men assaulted black women to enforce rules of racial and economic hierarchy. at the dark end of the street summary

At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black At the dark end of the street summary. New York: Alfred A, at the dark end of the street summary. Uncovering the stories of shocking violence and indifference through abduction, exploitation, and prejudicial legal systems, McGuire connects Southern cultural norms, political discrimination, and legal conduct to the white supremacy that denied African American women their civil rights for decades in the South.

McGuire details a history of demeaning and violent abuses bus drivers heaped upon African American women that created an atmosphere of terror for Southern bus passengers to show that the women of Montgomery were ready to instigate a change. While many viewed Brown v. Board of Education as a milestone for desegregation, McGuire shows another side to this victory by describing the violent reaction and attacks against African Americans by white supremacists to restore a perceived notion of social order through violent intimidation tactics.

McGuire explores the long history of sexual domination as a tool for white supremacy and also as a reaction to fears of loss of social and political power and control.

This domination was not limited to private spaces of homes or dark roads, or even public spaces like busses, but extended to places that should have been protected by symbols of power. Virginia to demonstrate that after decades of abuse, activism, and court cases, African American women had won rights against sexual violence and to claim control of their bodies and to choose their sexual partners, a form of civil rights that McGuire contends receives less historical notice than it deserves.

This battleground reveals a more personal space than the legal battles for economic equality and the right to work as tender chat by Risa Goluboff in The Lost Promise of Civil Rights or rights to desegregated education and public spaces as described by William Chafe in Civilities and Civil Rights.

The litany of court cases described by McGuire provides shocking evidence of the train of abuses suffered by women in the South and the degree of hesitation Southern courts responded to calls for justice. By publicizing trials that failed to deliver justice along with trials that made progress in dismantling the walls of entrenched sexual and racial prejudice, McGuire illuminates the degree of deprivation of sexual rights endured by At the dark end of the street summary American women in contrast with the preferential and hyper-sexualized rights of white men.

To end her argument with the case of Loving v. According to McGuire, the issue of respectability made Rosa Parks the perfect choice as the symbolic spark to initiate the Montgomery bus boycotts. By placing these arguments solely as a right of African American women versus white Southern men, she limits the definition of sexual rights to a specific racial group within a specific chronology, but opens the door to expanding scholarship to include how these cases and experiences influence other minority groups facing similar exploitation.

Also, to compare legal cases across the South gives the impression that all Southern courts failed to live up to legal expectations or that this was a strictly Southern phenomenon. A broader interpretation of comparative Northern cases may help shed light on viewpoints across the Mason-Dixon line and how well entrenched the jury decisions to indict were based on tender dating prejudices or national norms.

Even for historians who are not well-versed in the history of the civil rights, it is clear that Danielle McGuire has proposed a radical new way to view the emergence of the civil rights movement. Her narrative not only attacks the roles of male leaders, but also revives the activism of women such as Rosa Parks, whose image was altered dramatically during the Montgomery bus boycott and her trial.

Despite a long career of activism, Parks was re-imagined as a wholesome, pure example of black womanhood who could stand in for the plight of the black community. Although she does not ignore completely the struggle between black and white men, she brings into the history of the civil rights the women whose lifelong battle against oppression trained them for the emerging movement.

For the black women who endured racial and sexual discrimination and continued to give testimony to such abuses, the struggle for civil rights was also a struggle for the right to dignity and bodily integrity. More significantly, McGuire demonstrates that black women consistently spoke out against these crimes, giving testimony that drew attention to such violations and that helped women reclaim their own bodies.

Further, these testimonies helped to bring national attention to the issue of rape and to its racial implications. While the stories she includes are powerful in themselves, McGuire succeeds in placing them in larger civil rights narratives.

Indeed, it was women who made up the majority of black passengers and thus the majority of boycotters. Black women on city buses consistently challenged discrimination, some finding themselves in courtrooms where they would again assert rights to dignity and respect. Many scholars have examined the racialized sexual violence that black women endured during the Jim Crow era, but McGuire goes beyond this to explore how black women responded to such abuses. According to McGuire African American women had long been struggling against sexualized violence and rape and were actually the harbingers and often forgotten leaders of movements like the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

She argues that the civil rights movement actually owes its formation to the women fighting for the protection of black women and their bodies. She alters the traditional view of civil rights heroine Rosa Parks by debunking the myth that she was simply a tired domestic who refused to free military dating apps up her seat on a bus, sparking one of the biggest events in the movements.

This fascinating work totally transforms the way the history of the civil rights movements should be taught- women should not be peripheral players with an occasional female heroine, they should constitute the core, equal, if not in some cases usurping the position of the men involved.

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